• Joint Microbiome Facility (JMF)

    of the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Vienna

  • The Joint Microbiome Facility provides

    highly multiplexed gene amplicon sequencing

  • The Joint Microbiome Facility provides

    whole genome sequencing

  • The Joint Microbiome Facility provides

    metagenome and metatranscriptome sequencing

JMF News

Latest publications

Is Too Much Fertilizer a Problem?

Fertilizers are added to crops in order to produce enough food to feed the human population. Fertilizers provide crops with nutrients like potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen, which allow crops to grow bigger, faster, and to produce more food. Nitrogen in particular is an essential nutrient for the growth of every organism on Earth. Nitrogen is all around us and makes up about 78% of the air you breathe. However, plants and animals cannot use the nitrogen gas in the air. To grow, plants require nitrogen compounds from the soil, which can be produced naturally or be provided by fertilizers. However, applying excessive amounts of fertilizer leads to the release of harmful greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and the eutrophication of our waterways. Scientists are currently trying to find solutions to reduce the environmentally harmful effects of fertilizers, without reducing the amount of food we can produce when using them.

Sedlacek C, Giguere A, Pjevac P
2020 - Front. Young Minds, 8: 63

The role of metal contamination in shaping microbial communities in heavily polluted marine sediments.

Microorganisms in coastal sediments are fundamental for ecosystem functioning, and regulate processes relevant in global biogeochemical cycles. Still, our understanding of the effects anthropogenic perturbation and pollution can have on microbial communities in marine sediments is limited. We surveyed the microbial diversity, and the occurrence and abundance of metal and antibiotic resistance genes is sediments collected from the Pula Bay (Croatia), one of the most significantly polluted sites along the Croatian coast. With a collection of 14 samples from the bay area, we were able to generate a detailed status quo picture of a site that only recently started a cleaning and remediation process (closing of sewage pipes and reduction of industrial activity). The concentrations of heavy metals in Pula Bay sediments are significantly higher than in pristine sediments from the Adriatic Sea, and in some cases, manifold exceed international sediment quality guidelines. While the sedimentary concentrations of heavy metals did significantly influence the abundance of the tested metal resistance genes, no strong effect of heavy metal pollution on the overall microbial community composition was observed. Like in many other marine sediments, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidota and Desulfobacterota dominated the microbial community composition in most samples, and community assembly was primarily driven by water column depth and nutrient (carbon and nitrogen) availability, regardless of the degree of heavy metal pollution.

Di Cesare A, Pjevac P, Eckert E, Curkov N, Miko Šparica M, Corno G, Orlić S
2020 - Environ. Pollut., 114823

Transcriptomic Response of Nitrosomonas europaea Transitioned from Ammonia- to Oxygen-Limited Steady-State Growth.

Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms perform the first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. The bacterium is the best-characterized ammonia oxidizer to date. Exposure to hypoxic conditions has a profound effect on the physiology of , e.g., by inducing nitrifier denitrification, resulting in increased nitric and nitrous oxide production. This metabolic shift is of major significance in agricultural soils, as it contributes to fertilizer loss and global climate change. Previous studies investigating the effect of oxygen limitation on have focused on the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in nitrification and nitrifier denitrification. Here, we combine steady-state cultivation with whole-genome transcriptomics to investigate the overall effect of oxygen limitation on Under oxygen-limited conditions, growth yield was reduced and ammonia-to-nitrite conversion was not stoichiometric, suggesting the production of nitrogenous gases. However, the transcription of the principal nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) did not change significantly during oxygen-limited growth, while the transcription of the nitrite reductase-encoding gene () was significantly lower. In contrast, both heme-copper-containing cytochrome oxidases encoded by were upregulated during oxygen-limited growth. Particularly striking was the significant increase in transcription of the B-type heme-copper oxidase, proposed to function as a nitric oxide reductase (sNOR) in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. In the context of previous physiological studies, as well as the evolutionary placement of sNOR with regard to other heme-copper oxidases, these results suggest sNOR may function as a high-affinity terminal oxidase in and other ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Nitrification is a ubiquitous microbially mediated process in the environment and an essential process in engineered systems such as wastewater and drinking water treatment plants. However, nitrification also contributes to fertilizer loss from agricultural environments, increasing the eutrophication of downstream aquatic ecosystems, and produces the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. As ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are the most dominant ammonia-oxidizing microbes in fertilized agricultural soils, understanding their responses to a variety of environmental conditions is essential for curbing the negative environmental effects of nitrification. Notably, oxygen limitation has been reported to significantly increase nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production during nitrification. Here, we investigate the physiology of the best-characterized ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, , growing under oxygen-limited conditions.

Sedlacek CJ, Giguere AT, Dobie MD, Mellbye BL, Ferrell RV, Woebken D, Sayavedra-Soto LA, Bottomley PJ, Daims H, Wagner M, Pjevac P
2020 - mSystems, 1: e00562-19